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Bandagi preaches peace

Bandagi preaches peace

- Rohit Pramar
Event : Bandagi Live
Featuring : Tochi Raina's Bandagi
Venue : Sophia Bhabha Hall, Mumbai
Date : 9 September, 2010
One needs to be very courageous when it comes to mixing Indian classical music with western classical music and Tochi Raina is definitely one of them. After tasting success from the movie Aisha, he has now formed his band called Bandagi.

Bandagi is a sufi rock band with a entwine of Tochi Raina, two lead guitarists (Alok and Chintu Singh), bassist (Avi), drummer (Dev), tabla player (Surinder), and keyboardist (Anu). Sufi and Jazz are alike in many ways, however it’s hard to make sense of why would Sufi music be jazzed, until the band hit the stage to perform. Their fine tunes answered all the questions.

Tochi sprang up, shimmied and vibrated around the stage on Thursday at Sophie Bhabha Hall. The gig was high on Sufi flavour as they performed some of their original compositions like ‘Main vich basendi’ and ‘Rabbe’. On the other hand, the twist came in with Jazz renditions by their guitarist (Alok).

It was very apparent from the crowd’s reactions how much everyone cherished patronization of Sufi music with jazz. It was indeed a new experience for everyone as they discovered an entirely new genre called Sufism Jazz which is entirely Bandagi's.

Having lent his vocal chords to churn out many hits in movies, Tochi Raina also performed some of his popular songs on the audience’s demand. He performed songs like ‘Iktara’ from Wake Up Sid, ‘Pardesi’ from Dev D, and the hottest club sensation ‘Gal Mitthi Mitthi Bol’ from Aisha.

The show was titled Rooh Da Banjara with a motive of spreading the message of peace through music. The excellent band indeed helped spread the message.

Despite the involvedness of the band's music, the fine distinctions of the instrumentation were audible and Tochi's vocals came through clearly. Conversely, Bandagi put an end to such religious conflicts and casteism with their music as the crowd cheered together for the band on Thursday night.
 
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